New Orleans Sunrise, March 15, 2011

Posted By Mike Padgett

Jan. 17, 2018

 

Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

Jan 17th, 2018

Surprise visit from one of nature’s desert felines

Posted By Mike Padgett


July 3, 2017

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – A bobcat wandered into our lives 24 hours ago. We were standing in our dining room preparing to tackle a new jigsaw puzzle when the four-legged visitor surprised us.

The desert feline was just a few feet from us, on the other side of the glass patio door. That side of our home has a view of the Arizona desert.

The bobcat didn’t see us standing close to the windows and glass door as it passed. We hurried into the next room where there are more windows and another patio door. We found the bobcat laying on its left side with its back to us. A few minutes later, it changed position and faced the glass. It apparently decided our patio was a safe place for a cat nap.

 

The bobcat appears to be looking at its reflection in our patio windows. Photo copyright © Mike Padgett

 

Because they are timid and usually nocturnal, bobcats typically avoid human contact. However, they are attracted to water supplies and small animals in urban areas.

I retrieved my camera from another room and reached for the cord to raise the window shade. Very slowly. The bobcat’s eyes were closed. Its breathing was rapid. The outside temperature was about 100 degrees.

I raised the shade a few feet. I crouched within two feet of the bobcat, separated from it by floor-to-ceiling patio windows and a glass door. The bobcat looked to be about 15 inches tall at the shoulder.

For several minutes, we enjoyed the resting animal’s beauty. But it remained vigilant. Its eyes were mostly closed but it cocked its ears back and forth, listening for danger. Or potential food.

Unseen were large and dangerous claws withdrawn into the fur of its broad paws. The bobcat’s mouth was partly open because it was panting. Its sharp teeth were visible. Its diet consists of rats, rabbits, and other small animals.

 

The desert cat eventually made eye contact with me after I lowered my camera from my face. Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

 

Despite its beauty, the bobcat is wild. We did not want it to make our patio its new home so after an impromptu photo session over 15 minutes, I tapped on the window with my left hand. With my right hand, I kept my camera to my face.

The bobcat opened its eyes. It raised its head slowly. It ignored my camera and remained focused on my moving fingers tapping the glass.

After several seconds, the bobcat raised itself into a sphinx-like pose. I lowered the camera from my face. It moved its eyes from my fingers to my face. We made eye contact. That is when the wild cat slowly stood up and began walking away. It kept its ears cocked backwards, listening for danger.

 

Realizing it won’t get any rest with an audience, the bobcat decided to leave. Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

It disappeared around the barbecue at a corner of our home. After a few minutes, I went out to see if it was gone. It was. The 6-foot-high block wall and the metal view fence around our backyard are not obstacles for wildcats and their powerful legs.

Years ago, I stepped out the front door of our previous home and surprised an adult bobcat in the front courtyard. It was standing next to the 4-foot-high courtyard wall. In the bobcat’s mouth was a rabbit. After a few seconds of watching me, the bobcat – with the rabbit still in its mouth – jumped up onto the wall. Then it was gone.

For more information about bobcats, visit the Arizona Game & Fish Department.

 

(Copyright @ Mike Padgett, ArizonaNotebook.com. All applicable U.S. and International copyright laws pertain to any and all photographs and other images and articles on this site. Downloading, hot-linking, copying, reproducing, manipulating in any way and/or distribution by print, electronic media or other means is prohibited by law.)

 

(Please contact Mike Padgett if you are interested in purchasing prints or licensing images on this site, or if you wish to use any of the images on this site for noncommercial purposes. All rights reserved.)

 

(Ideas for interesting news stories about Arizona residents and businesses are welcome. Please send ideas and suggestions to mike@ArizonaNotebook.com.)

 

(If you see a typo or a factual error, please contact us so we can correct it.)

 

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Jul 3rd, 2017

It’s a good day when a coiled rattlesnake doesn’t strike

Posted By Mike Padgett

May 2, 2017

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – Today became a little brighter when I realized the rattlesnake had remained motionless while I worked just outside its striking range.

The young rattler retreated to safety behind a potted agave and a barrel cactus. Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

For about 15 minutes before I spotted the rattler, I had worked in front of the trash barrel. I was cutting small mesquite tree limbs into short sections that would fit in the barrel.

Little did I know danger was nearby. I did not see the snake until I finished cutting up the limbs. When I reached to close the trash barrel’s lid, I looked down and saw the nearly invisible snake coiled and motionless. I was standing in front of the barrel. The snake was on the right side about five feet from me. I was wearing shorts and hiking shoes, ready for my morning walk.

It was my first rattlesnake encounter of the season. It was a young snake, judging from its small size. The snake’s head was visible, pointed at me. The tip of its tail was tucked under its coiled body. The snake’s coloration was excellent camouflage that resembled the gray-and-tan granite gravel.

 

Motionless, the young snake didn’t catch my attention until I looked in its direction next to the trash barrel. Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

It didn’t move, so I went to get my camera. I grabbed a leaf rake on my way through the garage so I could gently scoop up the rattler and carry it to the desert wash behind our home. Before I disturbed the snake, I shot a few photos while it was coiled. Such deadly beauty in a small package.

I tried to use the rake to try to pick up the snake, but it became cranky. It raised its head, backed slightly away and struck at the rake.

When it stretched out to slither away, I guessed the adolescent snake was about 15 inches long. It had three or four rattles on its tail. Depending on the species, adult rattlesnakes can exceed six feet in length and weigh 10 or more pounds.

I thought about recent news stories quoting medical experts as saying the costs for treatment of rattlesnake bites today can reach into the high five figures, sometimes more.

I followed the snake and shot several more photos. After a few feet, it retreated behind a potted agave and a golden barrel cactus. Perfect, I thought. The plants offer better perspective for photos.

Still aggravated, the snake coiled into a sort of figure eight and raised its head slightly, keeping its head and flicking tongue aimed my way. I kept 10 feet or more between us.

My neighbor, who has a snake tong, volunteered to remove the rattler. She used the tong to gently pick up the snake. She placed it in a white bucket and covered it. She said she would release it in the desert a safe distance from homes.

Later, she told me the snake was not happy. She said it had rattled nonstop during the short drive to its new home.

I must get myself a snake tong. In recent years, I have walked close to two other resting rattlesnakes. One was outside our back door at our previous home. I used a leaf rake to lift it and place it in the open desert behind our home.

The other snake encounter was after sunset outside our front door. I remember seeing what I thought was a broom handle on the walkway between me and the front door. I stepped over it to unlock and open the door.

I turned on the outside light and looked back, wondering who left a broom outside our door. A second or two after the light came on, the “broom handle” came alive. It was a large rattlesnake that had been stretched out to soak up warmth from the concrete.

Armed with a flashlight, I used water sprayed from a garden hose to guide the large rattler out the front gate.

 

(Copyright @ Mike Padgett, ArizonaNotebook.com. All applicable U.S. and International copyright laws pertain to any and all photographs and other images and articles on this site. Downloading, hot-linking, copying, reproducing, manipulating in any way and/or distribution by print, electronic media or other means is prohibited by law.)

 

(Please contact Mike Padgett if you are interested in purchasing prints or licensing images on this site, or if you wish to use any of the images on this site for noncommercial purposes. All rights reserved.)

 

(Ideas for interesting news stories about Arizona residents and businesses are welcome. Please send ideas and suggestions to mike@ArizonaNotebook.com.)

 

(If you see a typo or a factual error, please contact us so we can correct it.)

 

(To avoid missing news, essays, features and photos on www.ArizonaNotebook.com, sign up for convenient email alerts in the FeedBurner box in the right rail.

May 2nd, 2017

Colorful art sparkles after dark in Arizona

Posted By Mike Padgett

Feb. 27, 2017

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – Picture several displays of artistic creations illuminated from within by various colors. One display is a set of five helium kites hovering over visitors’ heads. In a nearby canal is a collection of 50 floating spheres.

The imaginative creations were part of a busy outdoor art scene my Best Friend and I enjoyed last week. It was where we mingled at sunset with creative spirits and their whimsical art.

For two consecutive evenings, we admired the colorful creations of several artists at a popular exhibit sponsored by Scottsdale Public Art.

The Feb. 23-26 display, called Canal Convergence Water + Art + Light, offered visitors a variety of artistic works that include light and changing colors.

The Thursday-to-Sunday events began at 4 p.m. closed at 10 p.m. daily. The spectacle offered a variety of colorful creations, including tall metal polyhedron sculptures, helium light kites, and colorful spheres floating on water.

Colorful and intricate shadows were cast by HYBYCOZO, a display consisting of three 7-foot-tall polyhedron sculptures. Internal LEDs shining through the geometric designs created intricate designs of changing colors on the surrounding sidewalks.

HYBYCOZO, created by San Francisco artists Yelena Filipchuk, who is an environmental scientist, and Serge Beaulieu, an industrial designer. Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

Les Lumineoles is an aerial display of helium light kites, which appeared to float on the night breeze. If their gentle movements were put to music, a solo of a piano or a saxophone would be appropriate. Floating nearby in the Arizona Canal is another display, Lentille d’eau, which consists of 50 luminous spheres that change color. The two adjacent displays were created by the French artist association Porte par le vent.

Les Lumineoles, above, and Lentille d’eau, right, floating in the Arizona Canal. Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

The event featured more than 30 attractions near, over or in the Arizona Canal at Scottsdale Waterfront, which is between Scottsdale Road and Goldwater Boulevard, south of Camelback Road.

The creative and colorful works were a welcome distraction from the daily barrage of negative political news. It was rejuvenating. It was real.

The first night, a Thursday, was more crowded than we expected. I was not satisfied with my photos because spectators predictably crowded around the artists’ works. My Best Friend said we should return the next night at a later time for more photos. She was right.

(Copyright @ Mike Padgett, ArizonaNotebook.com. All applicable U.S. and International copyright laws pertain to any and all photographs and other images and articles on this site. Downloading, hot-linking, copying, reproducing, manipulating in any way and/or distribution by print, electronic media or other means is prohibited by law.)

(Please contact Mike Padgett if you are interested in purchasing prints or licensing images on this site, or if you wish to use any of the images on this site for noncommercial purposes. All rights reserved.)

(Ideas for interesting news stories about Arizona residents and businesses are welcome. Please send ideas and suggestions to mike@ArizonaNotebook.com.)

(If you see a typo or a factual error, please contact us so we can correct it.)

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Feb 27th, 2017

Arizona sunset in early January

Posted By Mike Padgett

Jan. 9, 2017

Sunset over north Scottsdale, Ariz. Photo © copyright Mike Padgett

“A large drop of sun lingered on the horizon and then dripped over and was gone, and the sky was brilliant over the spot where it had gone, and a torn cloud, like a bloody rag, hung over the spot of its going. And dusk crept over the sky from the eastern horizon, and darkness crept over the land from the east.”
John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

Jan 9th, 2017
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Forever Views in Red Rock Country North of Phoenix

Posted By Mike Padgett

Dec. 12, 2016

sedona

Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

SEDONA, Ariz. – About 120 miles north of Phoenix are some of Mother Nature’s best creations. The absence of city noise and pollution and the contrast of towering red bluffs with the high desert’s greenery are good for the soul. Pack a picnic lunch and a good book and find a solitary location near Sedona to enjoy the views with a best friend.

Dec 12th, 2016
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New Stars Lighting Sonoran Desert Nights

Posted By Mike Padgett

April 24, 2016

PHOENIX – Every evening after sunset, there are colorful new stars in the night at Desert Botanical Garden.

The stars are eight distinct displays installed throughout the garden by British artist Bruce Munro. His creative work, “Bruce Munro: Sonoran Light at Desert Botanical Garden,” runs through May 8.

Munro and garden workers and volunteers spent several weeks installing hundreds of miles of glowing fiber optics for the brilliant display.

The largest exhibit, called “Field of Light,” features a network of about “30,000 individual spheres of gently blooming light nestled on the hillside of the Garden Butte,” according to a description of the exhibit on the garden website.

 

Field of Light

“Field of Light” photo by Adam Rodriguez.

Another of Munro’s works is called “Water-Towers.” It consists of plastic bottles assembled into towers of light that slowly change color. If visitors walk to the western edge of this exhibit and look back past the “Water-Towers,” they will see the “Field of Light” display on the side of Garden Butte in the background.

 

Water-Towers

“Water-Towers” photo by Adam Rodriguez.

In the garden’s Sybil B. Harrington Succulent Gallery is a display of spiraling acrylic rods called “Chindi,” which in Navajo means dust devil.

 

Chindi

“Chindi” photo by Adam Rodriguez.

We visited the exhibit earlier this month. It was a Tuesday. The special exhibit is popular, so advance reservations are recommended. Garden members must log in on the garden website to receive free reservations. To avoid crowds, garden officials recommend arriving after 8 p.m. The exhibit is open until 11 p.m.

We arrived at the garden at 6:30 p.m. That gave us about 30 minutes to park, enter the garden and get our bearings before sunset.

The exhibit’s colorful fiber optics become brighter as daylight fades into darkness. It is after sunset when Munro’s creations become the newest stars of the night.

The light-based installations reflect the artist’s interpretation of the Sonoran Desert’s flora and fauna.

 

MunroMedium

Artist Bruce Munro. Photo by Mark Pickthall.

Munro’s other current exhibitions are at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum in Chaska, Minnesota, and the “Field of Light Uluru” at Ayers Rock Resort in Uluru, Australia.

Previously, Munro has displayed his creativity at gardens and museums worldwide. They include the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; the Guggenheim Museum, New York City; Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania; Cheekwood Botanical Garden & Museum of Art, Nashville, Tennessee; Hermitage Museum & Gardens, Norfolk, Virginia; Simbionte, Mexico City; Discovery Green, Houston, Texas; Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta, Georgia; and many others.

For more details about the “Sonoran Light” exhibit, visit www.dbg.org.

More information about the artist is available at www.brucemunro.co.uk.

 

(Copyright @ Mike Padgett, ArizonaNotebook.com. All applicable U.S. and International copyright laws pertain to any and all photographs and other images and articles on this site. Downloading, hot-linking, copying, reproducing, manipulating in any way and/or distribution by print, electronic media or other means is prohibited by law.)

(Please contact Mike Padgett if you are interested in purchasing prints or licensing images on this site, or if you wish to use any of the images on this site for noncommercial purposes. All rights reserved.)

(Ideas for interesting news stories about Arizona residents and businesses are welcome. Please send ideas and suggestions to mike@ArizonaNotebook.com.)

(To avoid missing news, essays, features and photos on www.ArizonaNotebook.com, sign up for convenient email alerts in the FeedBurner box in the right rail. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose.)

Apr 24th, 2016

Oregon Sunset, Between Trees

Posted By Mike Padgett

Feb. 9, 2016

 

IMG_4805 

Photo © copyright by Mike Padgett

“My soul is full of longing for the secrets of the sea, and the heart of the great ocean sends a thrilling pulse through me.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Feb 9th, 2016

A few days in the lives of baby hummingbirds

Posted By Mike Padgett

March 14, 2015

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – The tiniest sword swallowers are gone. Over 10 days, I watched them grow. I was a spectator until they launched themselves from a nest the size of an empty walnut shell.

 

I spotted the nest the morning of March 3. A hummingbird hovered nearby before flying to a bump on a tree branch. I walked slowly toward the iridescent jewel of nature and discovered the bump was its nest. After she flew away, a single tiny beak popped up over the edge of the nest.

SingleBeak                      

Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

 

Over the next several days, I approached the nest slowly. I hoped to document – with photos – the first days in the life of hummingbirds. The tree was next to our driveway and the sidewalk, so the hummingbird was familiar with my daily routine and occasional joggers.

 

These magical birds in recent years have treated me with several close encounters. They have no fear, probably because of their speed. Once, while standing in our courtyard, a hummingbird hovered within inches of my face. Maybe it was attracted by its reflection in my sunglasses.

 

Over a period of several days, I watched two chicks grow rapidly. First, I could see only the tips of their tiny black beaks poking over the edge of the nest. Soon, their beaks were longer. Next, I could see the tops of their heads. I watched the mother feeding them a diet of nectar and insects.

 

 

 

Feeding2

                          Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

 

A few times, mother hummer returned while I was watching her nest. I captured images of her feeding her chicks. Her shiny black needle-like beak disappearing down their throats reminded me of the circus posters of sword swallowers.

I photographed the nest almost every day. Mornings offered the best light. Nine days after I discovered the nest, the chicks were spilling out of the nest. Soon, they gripped the nest with their tiny claws as they exercised their wings.

 

FlappingWings                     

Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

 

The nest’s location in the tree offered only one ideal spot from which to shoot photos. After feeding its young, the mother usually sat on the edge of its nest for a few seconds. A few times, it flew towards me. It hovered close to me and my camera at my face. I stood motionless.

 

The tiny bird stayed within arm’s length for a few seconds before zipping to a nearby branch. It preened its brilliant green feathers or stretched its wings. Then it vanished to retrieve more food for its babies. The father has no role in the care and feeding of its young, according to www.worldofhummingbirds.com.

 

HummerWatching                     

Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

 

On March 12, nine days after I discovered them, the young birds appeared to be ready for their first flight. Near sunset, I went to check on them a fourth time that day. Walking on the driveway, something to my left flew away from me and up into the tree. It appeared to struggle to gain altitude. I thought it was a large insect. But when it landed on a branch, I recognized it as one of the chicks. Then I spotted the mother and the other chick sitting on nearby branches.

 

I returned for my camera. One of the babies appeared less active than the other. It sat alone in the fork of a branch. I worried that it wouldn’t survive the night.

 

But the next morning, at sunrise and with my second cup of coffee, I saw that its sibling had joined it. I left to grab my camera. The day was cloudy, which meant photographing birds against a white sky. Ugh.

 

Huddled2                     

Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

 

The babies stayed huddled while I captured more images. They faced opposite directions on the branch. For what became the last time, they tolerated me with my camera. Soon, the mother returned to feed them.

 

FeedingOnBranch                     

Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

 

By late afternoon, they were gone. The empty nest was the only hint at the start of new lives.

 

 

(Copyright @ Mike Padgett, ArizonaNotebook.com. All applicable U.S. and International copyright laws pertain to any and all photographs and other images and articles on this site. Downloading, hot-linking, copying, reproducing, manipulating in any way and/or distribution by print, electronic media or other means is prohibited by law.)

 

(Please contact Mike Padgett if you are interested in purchasing prints or licensing images on this site, or if you wish to use any of the images on this site for noncommercial purposes. All rights reserved.)

 

(Ideas for interesting news stories about Arizona residents and businesses are welcome. Please send ideas and suggestions to mike@ArizonaNotebook.com.)

 

(To avoid missing news, essays, features and photos on www.ArizonaNotebook.com, sign up for convenient email alerts in the FeedBurner box in the right rail. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mar 14th, 2015

A Flood of Memories from a Desert Rain

Posted By Mike Padgett

Jan. 11, 2015

 

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – The smell of rain can revive memories.

 

Scientists say rain’s fresh smell comes from the action of rain and wind stirring up the air with ozone from the atmosphere and aromas from beneficial microbes in the soil.

 

I am sure that scientific explanation is true. To me, the smell of rain, sometimes accompanied by a colorful rainbow, can revive a memory. As years come and go, memories accumulate. Some become favorites, like books that will be kept and reread. Other memories are uncomfortable, even painful.

 

DesertRain

Raindrops collecting on mesquite trees add sparkle to the desert’s beauty. Photo copyright © by Mike Padgett

 

A recent rain and its fragrance triggered memories of a boy exploring along the Columbia River. This inquisitive first-grader once imagined he would have enjoyed exploring the American West. Until he read about life-or-death struggles faced by pioneers.

 

One day, as the boy searched for agates near the river’s edge a few miles west of The Dalles, Ore., a chunk of obsidian the size of a baseball was uncovered. The boy was visiting his grandparents. They were renting a house near the river. Today, the boy cannot remember if they found the obsidian and gave it to him, or if he found it.

 

The ancient glass rock, created eons ago by volcanic activity, is jet black with veins the color of blood. Maybe it came from Mount Hood or Mount Adams, the closest of several snow-covered and dormant volcanic peaks in the Cascade Mountains. Today, decades later, the shiny childhood treasure sits next to the boy’s laptop.

 

A year later, in a lazy mountain stream near Mount Hood, the little boy saw his first salamander. To him, the colorful four-legged creature was like an alien. He didn’t touch the salamander, but he squatted to watch it swim and meander slowly over water plants. Nature’s wonders had captured the attention of the boy, who then was in the second grade.

 

This was the year of other discoveries for the boy – learning how to navigate knee-deep snow; and making a kite from newspaper, glue, strips of balsa wood, and string. The kite soared. Until the string broke. The boy recovered his kite from the neighbor’s corrals. It never flew again because of damage from its nosedive.

 

 

Dangers of BB guns

 

The boy and a friend also learned the dangers of BB guns that year. The friend, probably acting out what he had seen in cowboy or war movies, fired his rifle at the boy. The BB pellet left a painful and bright red welt on the chest of the shirtless second-grader. The boy and his friend – who was a couple years older – vowed to keep the incident a secret. They never played that game again. The boy kept the welt hidden under his shirt as it faded.

 

By the next summer, the boy and his family had relocated to central Oregon. One day, the boy and his father left home to hunt deer. They had been walking for hours, without seeing any deer, when they heard an animal scream. It sounded like a large cat. They stopped to listen, but the animal made no other sounds. They never learned whether the cry came from a bobcat or a mountain lion.

 

The family was living in a small Oregon community. It had an elementary school, a small grocery store, several homes and a hobo camp near the railroad.

 

A short distance from the grocery store was a small shanty. It lacked a foundation, and the siding of unpainted wood had been darkened and dried by the sun. The boy learned it was the home of Otis, who lived alone.

 

The boy never learned Otis’ last name, nor did he ever see his face. Once, the boy saw Otis on the dirt path that led from his shanty to the store. He stopped to watch Otis walk slowly to his shanty. His shoulders were hunched.

 

The boy, who had been learning in his third-grade class how to write a check, wondered about Otis. He didn’t have a car or a job, so how did he pay for groceries from the general store? Did he have any friends? Where was his family?

 

Though Otis is long gone, he is represented today by many others living from check to check. If they have no family, they probably depend on social agencies for subsistence. If they are able, they might migrate to public housing in metro areas. Otherwise, they join the other homeless struggling in towns and cities across America.

 

 

A deer too far

 

Another year, the boy and his father again went deer hunting. From a high vantage point, they spotted a buck in the distance. The father dropped to one knee and took aim. Too far, he said.

 

The father aimed again. After a couple breaths, he gently pulled the trigger. The shot echoed across the valley. Missed. The buck fled into brush and trees. That was the only deer they saw that day.

 

The lingering raindrops and the fresh scent they create in the desert prompted these fleeting memories and others.

 

Fast forward a few years, past the boy’s part-time jobs after school, the Army’s draft notice he received after joining the Air Force, past his university graduation, a rewarding career that lasted decades, and his other encounters with nature.

 

There was the black rattlesnake resting coiled along a hiking trail, and his accidentally stepping over another rattlesnake stretched in the dark across a warm sidewalk. Once, he had an arms-length staredown with a territorial hummingbird, and he wrote about riding with a park ranger to check on a pair of eagles nesting in a cliff over a lake.

 

 

If Native American ruins could talk

 

Nature is one of many topics that fascinate my Best Friend and me. She introduced me to archeology. I introduced her to walks in the forest as well as in the desert. One summer weekend, while camping in northeastern Arizona, we shifted closer in our sleeping bags during a lightning storm.

 

Sleep finally arrived, after the thunder and lightning. The next day, we turned off the gravel road on the Mogollon Rim to follow a logging road. We drove a short distance before parking. We had the forest to ourselves. It was a sunny summer day with fresh mountain air and the sounds of a gentle wind rustling through treetops.

 

On the ground, where logging equipment had disturbed the soil, we saw shell fossils. Maybe they were brachiopods, marine creatures that lived on ocean bottoms eons ago.

 

We also enjoyed walking at sunrise along the South Rim of the Grand Canyon and through California’s Muir Woods National Monument. Equally fascinating are Native American ruins in Arizona – Montezuma Castle National Monument, Tuzigoot National Monument and Canyon de Chelly National Park.

 

If the prehistoric ruins could talk, my Best Friend said, they could share some amazing history.

 

Some memories fade. Others are revived when a rain’s outdoor aroma encourages quiet reflection.

 

 

 

 

(Copyright @ Mike Padgett, ArizonaNotebook.com. All applicable U.S. and International copyright laws pertain to any and all photographs and other images and articles on this site. Downloading, hot-linking, copying, reproducing, manipulating in any way and/or distribution by print, electronic media or other means is prohibited by law.)

 

(Please contact Mike Padgett if you are interested in purchasing prints or licensing images on this site, or if you wish to use any of the images on this site for noncommercial purposes. All rights reserved.)

 

(Ideas for interesting news stories about Arizona residents and businesses are welcome. Please send ideas and suggestions to mike@ArizonaNotebook.com.)

 

(To avoid missing news, essays, features and photos on www.ArizonaNotebook.com, sign up for convenient email alerts in the FeedBurner box in the right rail. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose.)

 

 

Jan 11th, 2015
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